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NaPoWriMo 2008: A Poem a Day

Having failed to keep up last year (I must have churned out all of about seven poems) I've resolved to actually write a poem a day throughout the month of April for NaPoWriMo: National Poetry Writing Month.

So while I'm not attempting anything as ambitious as Rob MacKenzie's thirty part sequence poem (which promises to be an interesting read), I will be posting a poem each day on my thread at the Poetry Free-For-All, here. My first piece for the challenge, 'Lightning', is already up.

Feel free to drop in and read once in a while, then, or better still, start your own thread on the forum and take up the challenge!

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