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'The Nightmare' runner-up in the Poetry Society's Geoffrey Dearmer Prize



"There were well over sixty poems eligible for the 2012 Geoffrey Dearmer Prize, all from strong emerging voices curated by a variety of different editors, which has made for an especially rich field from which to have to pick particular flowers. Of the many poems I read and returned to again and again, five left enduring imprints no matter how often I re-read them - imaginatively, musically, in terms of the authority and associative power with which they explored the worlds they dramatised. They were Nicholas Laughlin's complex and thought-provoking 'Reading History', Candy Neubert's delicately building, quietly explosive 'ways to leave', Richard Scott's sensuous, highly charged 'Maz', Ben Wilkinson's 'The Nightmare' with its compelling fusion of the visionary and the real, and finally Kayo Chingonyi's winning poems from 'calling a spade a spade'."

- from Jane Draycott's judge's report.


The Geoffrey Dearmer Prize is awarded anually to the best Poetry Review poem written by a poet who doesn't yet have a full collection. It is funded through the generosity of the Dearmer family in honour of the poet Geoffrey Dearmer, who was a Poetry Society member.

Comments

Carrie Etter said…
Well done! I had a runner-up, too, for the Dearmer Prize years ago, so take that as you will!

When are you bringing out a book?
Ben Wilkinson said…
Cheers Carrie. You're a sterling poet, so I'm not surprised you've come close to grabbing the prize yourself! For me it was one of those strangely bittersweet occasions, since the winner was a guy whose work I genuinely admire. Nice to get a mention at any rate.

As to the book... I'm still in no hurry. I might've been writing 'seriously' and publishing widely for getting on eight or nine years now, but if I'm honest, the full-length book ms. feels like it's only halfway there. No point in padding the thing out with makeweight.

I am aiming to put out another pamphlet soon, though, so hopefully there'll be news of that before too long...

B x

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