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Matter magazine & Armitage reading


Matter, the annual magazine showcasing work from the Sheffield Hallam MA Writing, is now approaching its ninth edition; beginning to take shape and due to be published in October '09.

As well as new poetry and fiction, it'll also contain guest contributions, including new poems from Maurice Riordan, Tim Turnbull and - recently confirmed - Julia Copus.

For those interested in the editing and development of the magazine as it takes shape, the editors have also set up a Twitter page, giving occasional updates on the project. You can read it here.

I've been told that a website will shortly follow, and I'll no doubt post about the mag here again on the Wasteland sometime.

In a piece of loosely related news, Simon Armitage is reading in Sheffield on the 6th May, along with a short set from myself, Sheffield-based poet Chris Jones, and others, at a poetry event as part of a series to celebrate the completion of Jessop West, the new building which houses the Arts and Humanities departments of the University of Sheffield (pictured above). Tickets for the event are free - held at St George's Church, near Mappin St - but you need to register your interest here.

Comments

Unknown said…
They're nice looking buildings. A good way to celebrate completion with some poetry!
Tony Williams said…
Are they accepting submissions from old MAers still skulking around the place, Ben?

Don't think I can make the reading, as it's my son's birthday - hope it goes well, though.
Ben Wilkinson said…
Barbara - not sure about the new building yet myself; the old English department was a large Victorian/Edwardian house which had a certain charm to it. The move's probably for the best though.

Tony - they certainly are; I'll email the details to you shortly.
Ben Wilkinson said…
ps. you'll have to send me your new email; sending to the one I have just failed...

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