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Raw Light, the Guardian, and death by junk food

For those wanting an introduction to a selection of contemporary poets whose work you might've not come across before, you could do much worse than checking out Jane Holland's Raw Light blog, which is currently enjoying a 'Short Season of Other Poets'.

So far, poems from debut collections by Katy-Evans Bush, Matt Merritt, Angela France and Rob Mackenzie have been featured, a pretty eclectic selection in which you'll no doubt find something of interest. I hear that Claire Crowther, among others, is due to be featured before Raw Light resumes usual service, and at the moment, a poem from the sparks is also up there. Why not wander across, then, before you head out and enjoy a sunny Sunday afternoon?

Also worth a look this weekend for those who haven't spotted them already is Sean O'Brien's review of George Szirtes' New and Collected Poems in the Guardian and, though I'm a week or so late to flag this up, a thoughtful and interesting blog post by Adam O'Riordan on his time spent collecting together the late poet Michael Donaghy's critical prose work.

On a pretty repulsive and totally unrelated note, there's also this website that a friend sent me the link to earlier in the week. Apologies in advance. Though come to think of it, I'm pretty sure that cupcake used to be on the dessert menu at Fatty Arbuckles - and whatever happened to that franchise?

Comments

BarbaraS said…
I've been enjoying the 'Short Season' at Raw Light.

On another note, are you able to come to London to that Oxfam Reading of mighty British poets that you touted before? I'm booked and sorting out somewhere to stay :)
Ben Wilkinson said…
Unfortunately not, Barbara - as I feared I can't get out of work commitments (it's a lengthy train journey for me from Sheffield) and so will regrettably have to give it a miss. Really disappointed that I can't make it.

14 of the featured poets will be there on the night though - including Joe Dunthorne, Daljit Nagra, Emily Berry and Luke Kennard - so it promises to be grand. Enjoy yerself :)
Katy Murr said…
Hi Ben, I have some news for you!

I've got out the brown boxes, and now I'm over here at

http://www.katymurr.com/
BarbaraS said…
Oh that's a shame, never mind. Best of luck at StAnza all the same, perhaps our paths will cross again.

Can't wait to go, the line up looks very good indeed :))
Elizabeth said…
Picador publishes Michael Donaghy’s Collected Poems and his prose writings, The Shape of the Dance, this month. Please join us at the Southbank Centre this Saturday where we will be celebrating with two events.For details of how you can get 50% discount visit the Picador blog.http://tinyurl.com/c8trlh

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About the Author

Welcome to the website of the English poet and critic, Ben Wilkinson.
Ben was born in Staffordshire and now lives in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. He received his first degree from the University of Sheffield, and holds an MA and PhD from Sheffield Hallam University. He has won numerous awards for his poetry, including the Poetry Business Competition and a 2014 Northern Writers' Award
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He is a keen distance runner, lifelong Liverpool Football Club fan, and among other things he works as poetry critic for The Guardian and the Times Literary Supplement. You can find many of his reviews on this site.
To contact Ben about readings, workshops, or for any other enquiries, you can drop him a line at benwilko(at sign)gmail.com. Unfortunately, I am not able to consider unsolicited requests from authors for book reviews.

You can follow Ben on Twitter - @BenWilko85 - and on Facebook.

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