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Pomegranate Issue 3

Just some brief news in the recent publication of the latest issue of Pomegranate, the online magazine that publishes exciting new poems, reviews and features by young writers.

As well as a strong and varied selection of new poems by Claire Askew, George Ttoouli, Ben Davison and many others, there are articles on putting together a first collection by recent T.S. Eliot Prize-shortlisted poet Frances Leviston, on the politics behind poetry by Richard O'Brien, and on poetic voice by co-editor Emily Tesh. There's also a new poem by myself.

An illuminating and interesting interview with Canadian poet and UK Oxfam Writer In Residence Todd Swift also rounds the issue off, covering poetry and its crossover with the possibilities of the digital age, publishing work and getting noticed, and the emerging UK poets to look out for in the not-too-distant future. Well worth a read. In fact, along with the latest issue of Magma and Roddy Lumsden's article on working with young writers in the current issue of The London Magazine, things are looking increasingly exciting in the poetry world as a new generation of writers gradually emerges. Bravo to Pomegranate for being a part of it, then, and for developing a platform for young writers to showcase their work.

At this end, I'm re-reading poetry collections by two Irish poets for a review that will appear on Eyewear later this month, and having completed a new critical perspective of the poet Don Paterson for the Contemporary Writers site, I'm also working through researching and re-reading collections and novels by the prolific Simon Armitage, which has taken a bit longer than anticipated. In-between times, a few ideas and images for poems have cropped up, but they're mainly sitting in the notebook. Hopefully I'll get round to writing something soon, and also to reading Matt Merritt's first collection, Troy Town, which given the prize-winning 'Familiar' and the poems in his Happenstance pamphlet, will no doubt make for good reading.

Comments

Matt Merritt said…
Thanks very much, Ben. Hope you enjoy it.
Pomegranate all looks very interesting - look forward to having a proper read of it later in the week.

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